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Open Book Thread

82000 words and counting.  23 chapters done, with 2 more to go.  I can do this….

But forget about me.  A few of my friends have books out this week.  Let’s talk about them.

Treason’s Shore [Amazon | Mysterious Galaxy] is the fourth and final book in Sherwood Smith’s Inda series.  Check out her LiveJournal announcement for details about the book and the series, or just head over and congratulate her.

This week also marks the release of Vanished [Amazon | Mysterious Galaxy] by my JABberwocky buddy Kat Richardson.  (katatomic on LJ.)  Vanished is the fourth Greywalker novel, for the handful of you who don’t already know about the series.  Richardson has an excerpt of the novel posted on her web site.

Finally, we have C. F. Bentley’s novel Enigma [Amazon | Mysterious Galaxy].  This is the sequel to Harmony.  Bentley describes the books as “a spiritual journey with a literary twist in a space opera landscape.”  Bentley is one of my fellow DAW authors, and you can find her at her web site or on LJ as ramblin_phyl.

  

I’ll also give a shout out to James Van Pelt’s story collection The Radio Magician and Other Stories [Amazon | Mysterious Galaxy | B&N]. This one doesn’t come out until 9/1/09 (and I don’t think the Amazon or MG links work yet, but the B&N one does).  I’m only about 1/3 through, but … well, let me put it this way.  I was tempted to stop reading the thing, because I got through the first two stories and was embarrassed that I’d ever tried to write short fiction.  I’m behind on my reviewing, but I will be posting a review of this one later.  Van Pelt also posts some great writing-related stuff at jimvanpelt.

So what else is out that we should know about?  What have you been reading lately that you loved?  Let’s just make this an open book-chat thread, because I don’t think I’ve done that in a while.

Mirrored from Jim C. Hines.

Comments

( 27 comments — Leave a comment )
bookdraco
Aug. 5th, 2009 01:21 pm (UTC)
I am so enjoying Witch way to the Mall. A truely fun anthology about suburbia by Ester M Friesner.
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Witch-Way-to-the-Mall/Esther-Friesner/e/9781439132746/?itm=1]

And I just recently finished the first 3 books of the Raine Benares series by Lisa Shearin. ("In my family that's not silence, that's reloading.") I highly recommend them.
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Magic-Lost-Trouble-Found/Lisa-Shearin/e/9780441015054/?itm=3
jimhines
Aug. 5th, 2009 01:37 pm (UTC)
Very happy to hear that on Witch Way. I've got a story in Strip Mauled, the second volume, so it's very encouraging to hear it's so good!

I've seen Shearin's books before, but haven't read them yet. Sounds like fun reading!
gerriwritinglog
Aug. 5th, 2009 01:48 pm (UTC)
OMFG if you've read the rest of the Indi series, you've got to read Treason's Shore! It's amazing. :D
jimhines
Aug. 5th, 2009 02:46 pm (UTC)
I'm going to make sure Sherwood sees this comment :-)
gerriwritinglog
Aug. 5th, 2009 05:49 pm (UTC)
I put a similar comment up on her blog, too. :D

I've been in love with that series for a long time. :)
l_clausewitz
Aug. 5th, 2009 02:03 pm (UTC)
I haven't been reading anything new for a while now, so my favorite among the recently-read books is Unfinished Tales--that posthumous compilation and study of some major texts that underlie Tolkien's better-known works (like The Hobbit and LotR). One of the things I notice the most is how the military man in him shows through in the notes about Isildur's demise at the Gladden Fields and the battles and skirmishes preceding Saruman's outright invasion of Rohan.

And, of course, the contradictory accounts in many of his posthumously published texts in general are a delight to an amateur historian like me. I'd die happy if I could draw up half that much detail for only one of my fictional worlds....
jimhines
Aug. 5th, 2009 02:45 pm (UTC)
It blows my mind how much detail went into Tolkien's worldbuilding, and I've barely skimmed the surface of the secondary and supplemental works.

I'm remembering why I haven't done an open book thread in a while. I'm already struggling to keep up with my reading, and then people keep tossing out things that sound so interesting... D'oh! Must invent 48-hour day!
bookdraco
Aug. 5th, 2009 03:10 pm (UTC)
You have to read Farmer Giles of Ham. It's hilarious.
desperance
Aug. 5th, 2009 03:22 pm (UTC)
I played the king in a school production of Farmer Giles, 'way back when. (Indeed, that's how I got to meet Tolkien, it's that long ago...) But I don't think I've read it since. *is nudged* Thank you!
sixteenbynine
Aug. 5th, 2009 02:17 pm (UTC)
Not sure if this fits the topic precisely, but the second of the "Moribito" (series YA fantasy from Japan) has been out for a while now. I got hung up on other stuff so I haven't yet looked at it, but here's my take on the first one:

http://www.genjipress.com/2008/05/moribito-guardian-of-the-spiri.html
jimhines
Aug. 5th, 2009 02:42 pm (UTC)
Works for me. Stories are stories, and I'm not worried about topic drift. Thanks!
phantasm13
Aug. 5th, 2009 03:16 pm (UTC)
My to buy and to read list keeps getting longer...
jimhines
Aug. 5th, 2009 03:22 pm (UTC)
Tell me about it. It's a nice problem to have, and yet...
phantasm13
Aug. 5th, 2009 03:27 pm (UTC)
Hehe

It's would be a nicer problem to have if I ever had money to spare to buy books.
Having a husband who is making a career out of being a student puts a damper on book buying... mind you when he is done he will have a PHD... Four more years....

And some how he talked me into our last book purchase being the XDM: Extreme Dungeon Mastery.
I guess gaming books have their place too ;)
mtlawson
Aug. 5th, 2009 05:31 pm (UTC)
I feel your pain. This summer has not been nearly as good for reading as I'd hoped, and my queue keeps getting longer and longer....
emmycee
Aug. 5th, 2009 05:38 pm (UTC)
I did "Lies of Locke Lamora" finally, and boy, am I glad I did. What a great read!

I just finished Catherynne Valente's "Palimpsest", which was quite the head trip. Lyrical and gorgeous and written in an eyeblinding shade of purple.

So I'm following it up with Peter F. Hamilton's "The Dreaming Void". Because you should always follow fairy tales with hard sci-fi, right?
mtlawson
Aug. 5th, 2009 06:12 pm (UTC)
::grumbles::

I guess Locke is going back on the queue, then...
emmycee
Aug. 5th, 2009 06:25 pm (UTC)
You won't be sorry. It's terrific writing, and amazing characters. It's one of my favorites now.
bookdraco
Aug. 5th, 2009 06:43 pm (UTC)
And now it's on mine too. Along with RR Martin's game of thrones that one of my friends was shocked and horrified I hadn't read yet. I can't vouch for it, but he does.
mtlawson
Aug. 7th, 2009 09:59 pm (UTC)
Oh, I'm certain that it's great, it's that... Well, I don't feel like having the ol' Leaning Tower of Pisa fall on me if I add one more novel to it.

I want to beat it back down to a manageable level before I consider adding more to it.

(And I still haven't added some other books Jim has recommended -from Violette Malan and Steven Harper- to the queue yet.)
akiko
Aug. 5th, 2009 07:49 pm (UTC)
I bought Palimpsest on vacation, and I think "eyeblinding shade of purple" about covers it. I wish I'd enjoyed it more than I did, but I admit I have a preference for straightforward prose, rather than prose that meanders around the subject for a while before getting there, and then only vaguely hinting at the subject. But just about everybody else loved it to death and thinks it's the best book since sliced bread, so I'm left to wonder if I'm defective somehow. Oh well.
mtlawson
Aug. 5th, 2009 06:57 pm (UTC)
My reading this summer has been an exercise in watching my queue get larger. However, I've gotten a few novels read...

Medalon by Jennifer Fallon. I'm about halfway through the second book in the first trilogy, Treason Keep, and I've enjoyed the ride so far. She definitely has no qualms about knocking off characters -especially those I was expecting early on to become major ones- so I've decided to just hang on and see where it goes.

The Serpent's Tale by Ariana Franklin. Yes, it's historical fiction, but her first book Mistress of the Art of Death was recommended to me, and I enjoyed it enough that I made certain to read the next book in the series. It's CSI meets Twelfth Century England, and all the prejudices associated with the practice of medicine -and women practicing medicine- make for a very good story.

Dissolution by C.J. Sansom. More historical fiction, and this is the first of what are four novels (so far). It's a classic whodunit set in Henry VIII's newly formed Church of England, with religious conflict plus state corruption thrown in the mix.

katatomic
Aug. 5th, 2009 09:07 pm (UTC)
Thank you, Jim. I've been such a cheese lately, I have not been reading much LJ.
celestialgldfsh
Aug. 5th, 2009 09:45 pm (UTC)
Some of my recent favorites include "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins and the classic "On the Beach" by Nevil Shute.
cedunkley
Aug. 6th, 2009 12:08 am (UTC)
Well, I'm currently reading The Cipher by Diana Pharaoh Francis, the first book in her Crosspointe Series. And I'm also reading Warbreaker by Brandon Sanderson.

Next up will be Sherwood Smith's Inda series.
jimvanpelt
Aug. 8th, 2009 06:46 am (UTC)
Hi, Jim. Thanks for the mention of the collection. Are you at WorldCon perchance?

I've been reading blogs from there and living through them vicariously. My next convention will be MileHi in Denver the week before World Fantasy, and then I'll go to World Fantasy. That will exhaust the budget for sure.

Oh, well. The kids don't really need Christmas presents.
jimhines
Aug. 8th, 2009 01:30 pm (UTC)
No Worldcon for me, I'm afraid.

If I even hinted at a threat to the kids' Christmas loot, I suspect I'd wake up one morning bound with dental floss, Lilliputian style :-)
( 27 comments — Leave a comment )

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